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Service Dogs

Service Goldendoodles


The Goldendoodle is a very lovable dog, known for its exceptional intelligence
 and trainability, low to non-shedding coat, low allergy coat and low to no
doggie odor. Goldendoodles are sociable, friendly, non aggressive, and
extremely intuitive. Their intelligence and high trainability make them well
suited for guide dogs, therapy dogs, and other types of assistance dogs
.




On May 1st, 2005, Richter, bred by Amy Lane of Fox Creek Farms, became
the world's first F1 Standard Goldendoodle seeing eye guide dog.  In addition
to guide dogs, goldendoodles have been trained and used as service dogs,
seizure alert dogs, home companions, residential (community) companions,
and quality assistance dogs to people with mobility, hearing, neurological or
psychiatric disabilities.  Goldendoodles have worked with children in hospitals
across the world and also with neglected and abused children living in group
homes.  Goldendoodles are now also being used as search & rescue dogs.

Poodles are known for their remarkable intelligence and exceptional learning
ability. Golden Retrievers have long been known for their lovable, well-mannered,
 intelligent dispositions. Both breeds are loyal, confident and eager to please. 
It's no surprise that Goldendoodles make such amazing service dogs.  As the
popularity of Goldendoodles continues to grow, no doubt we will see many
more being used to help service our communities, neighbors, and friends.







Richter, the worlds first
Goldendoodle seeing eye dog.

 




Richter, his new owner, Melissa and
his trainer, Judy on graduation day!


 



 




-by Tami Mugler, Harli's mom - 2/26/08
Harli's Blue Obsidian, aka Obi, is not just a pet to Harli. He is her life
companion. He has, in his short one year, learned to pick up her remote
control, water bottle, and blanket when she drops them. Although not
consistent yet with putting them in her lap, he is getting
better all the time!The most important thing he has done for her, however,
 is ALERT US BEFORE a seizure begins! Harli had been seizure free for
over 12 years and we did not foresee ever needing Obi for this task. However,
 in October of 2007, Harli went into 'status' (which is one seizure after
another) lasting several hours. Prior to the seizures beginning, Obi had
tried to alert us. He put himself between Harli's home health aide and
refused to leave Harli's side! He even followed them into the shower where
 he KNOWS he is NOT allowed! I had to physically remove him from the
area in which he planted himself, outside the bathroom door!  I had no
 idea what he was trying to tell me....20 minutes later while getting Harli
dressed and still trying to keep Obi out of the way, Harli began seizing!
We laid Harli on her bed and awaited the ambulance. Obi positioned
himself over her legs on the bed and had to be physically removed when
the EMT's arrived.Harli has had 2 more episodes of seizures since that time
and Obi has ALERTED me each of those days as well.  We now pay very
close attention to Obi's behaviors and no longer excuse it to him being a
puppy.   Seizure Alert dogs are very special indeed. I am not sure you
can actually 'teach' this task.   Either the dog has it or they don't, and I
truly believe that it is an example of the depth
Harli and Obi bonded that he is so in tuned to her and how she is feeling.

Angelman Syndrome is a genetic disorder that effects speech, balance,
behavior, and causes developmental delays.  For more information
please visit
www.angelman.org


 





Carole and Josie headed a study for
Scripps Clinic & Research Institute.
They worked on teaching dogs to
detect cancer in urine. Josie and
Carole appeared on the CBS Early on 1/6/05.






 


The Amazing Walter and Perrin


Perrin is an autistic boy.  Walter is Perrin's wonderful companion and
friend.  Walter has never flinched during one of Perrinʼs physical episodes. 
He has always acted as if itʼs perfectly normal for this to occur.  Perrin
is very protective and concerned for Walter's well being and happiness. 


Many goldendoodles are now being used as companions and service
dogs for autistic children.  The dogs give the children more freedom
and also help with communication and anxiety while in public.

For more information on service dogs for autistic children please visit
these websites:

http://autismservicedogsofamerica.com/

http://www.nsd.on.ca/autism.htm

 


 
















Sunshine & Lorre

Sunshine is a service dog. You cannot tell by looking at Lorre that she has
a disability, as is true with many of the other 54 million Americans with
disabilities. If you live in TN, there is a chance you have seen Sunshine &
Lorre in the grocery store, walking in the mall, dining in a local restaurant,
walking in the park, arguing for or against a proposed bill in a legislative
committee, or conducting business at the bank. Sunshine weighs about 60
pounds, is two years old and as sweet as can be. She IS the Sunshine in Lorre's life.
Goldendoodles are being used as service dogs for those living with anxiety/panic
disorders, depression and Bipolar Disorder.  

For more information on service animals being used to help the emotionally
disabled, please visit these websites:

Psychiatric Service Dog Society
http://www.psychdog.org/about_mission.html

American Association of People with Disabilities
http://www.aapd-dc.org/index.php


 

These are only a few remarkable stories of how goldendoodles are being used
for service.  Goldendoodles touch our lives everyday.  Whether being used to
assist those with disabilities, lead the blind, alert seizures or snuggle at the end
of the day; A person who has
a goldendoodle to love is truly blessed with a wonderful friend.




  

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